In The Hills and Hollows going to Big Sky!

We are very excited to announce that In the Hills and Hollows will be premiering at the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival this February!

In The Hills and Hollows
Keely Kernan, 2016, USA, 76 minutes

Location: Sunday, Feb 19th @ 9:45 pm – Elks Lodge

World Premiere
The boom and bust coal industry that has dominated the landscape of West Virginia for over a century is being replaced by natural gas. IN THE HILLS AND HOLLOWS documents the lives of rural West Virginians and their communities, steeped in history and heritage, responding to yet another uncertain future.

Website: www.Inthehillsandhollows.com

To see the listing online please visit http://www.bigskyfilmfest.org/festival/films-2017-peak/in_the_hills_and_hollows

A Huge Thank You!

We met our goal on Kickstarter and want to thank everyone for their support. Listed below is everyone who supported the campaign. The names will also be listed on the end credits of the film. Thank you again so much for the incredible support. It means so much!

Charlie Tenenbaum
Jody Mohr
Danielle Corsetto
MelRose Ministries
Lisa Conley
Cass McCune
Martha Lockhart
Cheryl C Pullen
Louiqa Raschid
Amanda
Shaylyn McDaniel
Anthony & Lyndia Ervolina
George G Melenyzer
Cynthia Fraula-Hahn
Andrew Leary
Hali Taylor
Lori Cunningham
Bonnie Cranmer
Robert
Irene Hinkle
Julie Archer
rose forinash
Public Herald
Richter
Richard Hunt
Matthew Datcher
rebecca manson
Michelle Eshow
april keating
Autumn Environmental
Gary Auerbach
Catherine Claire Seaton
Adam Holden-Bache
Alisha Huber
Lara Shields
Jon West
Nancy Bevins
Suzanne Sharp
Charles Chong and Rebecca Eneix-Chong
David and Ann Loretan
Frank & Jennifer Muth
Elizabeth E Murray
Preston
Ashley Hoffman
Rose Kahn
Russell Smith
Shuan Butcher
Ted Chaloner
Jennifer Page
Lois Jenkins
Jeffrey Reed
Laura Ardison
Romey Craig Fluck
Linda Harrington
Paul Dalzell
Rich Gadow
Joan Simpson
Brad Keenan
Mark Reeve
Cristina McNary
Sara Wilts
K Bowers
Ashton Berdine
Brad King
Annie Seay
Dennis Mudloff
Nick and Glen Sabetto
Deborah Pettry
Mary Farley
Angela Phillips
Patrick O’Connor
Susie Donaldson
Wilson and Kenda
Painted Heroes
Adam Messer
Linda Sodaro
Jo Brown
Cory Nicholson
Stephen Combs
William James Smith
Kevin J Railsback
Mary Muncy
Julie Smith
Diane Pitcock
Kat Nicholson
Louanne Fatora
Julia M. Santiago
James Itokazu
Adam DeGraff
Levi Rose
Derek Furman
Anne White
Leslie Woodzell
Matt HARRINGTON
Jody Seibert
Heather Snodgrass
Janet Keating
Jessica Puckett
susan virginia mead
Camille Gage
Carol Cassidy Gillespie
Jason Cummings
Vivian Stockman
Ellen Smith
Alyssa Sabetto
kt
Edna Paullus
Julianna Wronski
Heather Matthies
Jo Hagerty
Heather Cantino
Rob
Cynthia Ellis
Charlie Treher
Michelle Wallen
Mike Arthur
Rich Moore
Autumn Long
Chris Cracknell
Larry Smith
DL Hamilton
Michael C. A. Scarmack, AIA
Tierra Curry
missyjay6
Eric Falquero
Cynthia Correll
Funlayo Alabi
Rik Heijmen
Dorothy
Robert Allington
Robin Blakeman
Rebecca Fauver Zullinger
Matthew McLean
Angela Kraus
Hope Covey
Mike Youngren
Linda Ireland
Carol Sheffield
Jody Mohr
Jan London
Nichole Ference
W!
Billy Heath III
Diane Stephenson
david stephenson
Rivera Cook
Carolyn Jane
Charise
Andrew
Shannon Chalfant
McFatter
Sherm Koons
Jessica Hallock
Kati Holland
Jojo Mehta
Paul Corbit Brown
patrick a frasher
joanne barker
Richard Cosh
Geert
Laura Ruhlman
Henry Horton
Ramona James
jim
Cecilia
Alisa Carlson
Linda
Cathy Lewis
Deborah Harris
Claire Takashima
Alan Kresse
Gayle Markow
Doreen Hing
Charlotte Rolle
Dieter Breisch
Shankar
Donna Rueth
victor stoecklein
El Tucker
Mary Ann Stiegel
Colleen Laffey
Marianne Hughes
Lucyna de Barbaro
Sam Holdren
Beth Lazear
Joe Gray
Bob Keel
Lora Price
Sinead Clear
Jinx McCune
Lindsay Barrick
Shannon McCarthy
Nathan Sams
John D Geelhaar
Sharon Day
Brent Eysler
Kristen Kernan

Screening in Huntington WV

Screened the extended trailer for the film in Huntington, WV during a gas forum at the Westmoreland Women’s Club. The forum provided information to residents about what may be in store for the area regarding natural gas development. Residents were able to hear first hand about disruptions to health, well-being and property do to the Marcellus Shale “boom” in the north-central part of West Virginia. The Rogersville shale is a relatively unexplored deep-shale formation under parts of northeast Kentucky and southwestern counties of West Virginia. Cabot Oil and Gas have drilled their first test well into the Rogersville shale. While the Marcellus is located around 5,000 feet underground, the Rogersville can be anywhere from 9,000 to 14,000 feet below the surface.

Today, there is less then 70 hours to share our kickstarter campaign and help share this collection of stories that are vital to the greater narrative that is taking place not only in West Virginia but throughout the Country. Thanks again for your support hillshollowsdoc.com

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Print from the Monongahela National Forest

There is only 4 days left for our kickstarter campaign. That means there is only 4 days left to help share the project and pledge to help us raise 20K by the 20th. I wanted to share a photograph from the Monongahela National Forest, an incredibly special place in West Virginia that is under threat of gas development. The construction process of the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline would involve clear-cutting a one hundred and fifty-five foot wide swath of land that would travel 550 miles from northern West Virginia, through the Monongahela National Forest, and into Virginia and North Carolina. A print of the photograph is one of our rewards for pledging to the kickstarter campaign. Thanks again everyone for your support and for sharing the project! hillshollowsdoc.com

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In the Hills and Hollows

By Keely Kernan

It was on the banks of the Ohio River that I was reunited with former residents of Tyler County, Annie and John Seay. They were staying in an RV park that had become home to over a dozen transient oil and gas workers. I first met Annie and John at their home in Lima, West Virginia that was situated up a hollow surrounded by the vast rolling mountains that encapsulate West Virginia. They moved here from California with the hope of living off the land and retiring in the quiet countryside. After spending years investing in their property and building their dream home they found themselves doing the unimaginable ­­ packing up and leaving West Virginia. Their property had been surrounded by dozens of gas wells and the smell of gas lingered in their hollow. There was no end in sight to the natural gas development that was transforming the rural landscape into an industrial zone. “There is no respect for rural areas and rural areas are the ones getting attacked,” says Annie. After years coping with all the development, the traffic, and the insecurity of the long term consequences associated with living next to dozens of gas wells they decided it was time to leave. They left their home in August of 2014 and moved into an RV. What they hadn’t sold at auction was packed up and placed in a storage facility until the time they found their new home.

As I walked towards their RV a large barge of coal slowly drifted down the Ohio River. It had been a few months since the last time I saw Annie and John. The weight of what had just happened and the unknown destination ahead of them was still heavy on their minds. However, their hope remained clear ­­ to find a new home. Ideally, somewhere this could never happen again.

In recent years West Virginia has had some of the highest rates of depopulation in the country. Many reasons have added to this such as the lack of employment opportunities and the mechanization and decline of the coal industry. After the Elk River chemical spill last January, dozens of for “For Sale” signs started popping up around Charleston. And now the natural gas boom has added to hasten the population drain. On my journey throughout the state I have met dozens of residents facing the same reality as Annie and John. Their stories bring to the surface larger issues that need addressed in our country today ­ such as mi​neral rights versus individual surface rights, eminent domain versus individual and community rights. Overall these stories provoke the question ­ what do property rights really mean? As Lewis County resident Tom Bond states, “I would be forced to contribute the value of my property to a private enterprise. It is basically unconstitutional.” B​ond is an 83 ­year ­old cattle farmer from Lewis County and like many residents living in West Virginia he does not own the minerals under the surface of his property.

Citizens across the nation are facing these challenges as natural gas development moves into their communities. What makes West Virginia unique is that in many ways this is a repeat of history. We have seen the legacy of the boom and bust coal industry, the poisoning of our waterways and the endless boarded up houses and empty store fronts that line the streets of towns that were once prosperous. In the southern part of the state the counties that produced the most coal are some of the poorest counties in the United States. We have seen wealth and resources leave and know what it is like to be left behind.

As I sat on the banks of the Ohio River and watched more coal barges flowing past I thought about the direction we are heading in yet again as a state. I have always believed in storytelling, particularly visual storytelling. I think it has the potential to connect us to people and places we might not otherwise know or understand. I hope that by sharing these stories it helps promote a very important conversation about what type of future we want to have as citizens.

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Filmmaker Keely Kernan is currently directing a feature film entitled, In the Hills and Hollows. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­The film f​ollows the lives of several West Virginia residents living in the middle of the natural gas boom. The film also juxtaposes t​he boom and bust coal industry that has dominated the landscape of West Virginia for over a century​with the current natural gas boom. A Kickstarter campaign was launched to raise additional funds needed in order to continue producing the film.​ For a list of Kickstarter rewards and pledge levels, visit hillshollowsdoc.com

Contributors have the opportunity to receive various rewards that include prints from the film, music from bluegrass musician Ben Townsend, art work from West Virginia artist Mike Costello special thanks in the end credits of the film, and much more. Those making the most significant contributions have the option of receiving credit as an associate producer, producer, or executive producer. Organizations also have the opportunity to receive official sponsorship credit with their name and logo in the end credits of the film.

Life in the Sacrifice Zone

Tina Del Prete from Doddridge County, WV lives in the middle of the fracking boom. It is the true sacrifice zone folks keep hearing about. Click here to contribute to our kickstarter campaign to help tell the stories of residents living at ground zero. hillshollowsdoc.com

Reposted from Appalachian Chronicles By Michael M. Barrick

WEST UNION, W.Va. – For more than a century, since the days of the logging industry and the beginning of coal mining, hardy West Virginia workers knew they were risking their lives every time they set foot on a steep mountainside to cut down a tree or work a longwall in the damp underground.

Then, the 1972 Buffalo Creek disaster made it clear that workers were not the only ones being asked to risk their lives for the fossil fuel extraction industry – average citizens were. That is the history of West Virginia; sadly, it is also the present.

Fracking has ruined the lives and livelihoods of countless West Virginians. The dangers from fracking are well-documented. In West Virginia, they are simply being ignored – except by a few people determined to have their story told.

One such West Virginian is Tina Del Prete. She told her story to filmmaker Keely Kernan, who is presently filming her feature film about fracking, “In the Hills and Hollows.” Keely recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to help finance the cost of production of the film.

Del Prete has lived on her 30-acre farm for 37 years. Fracking started in her area about five or six years ago. “The first thing we noticed was the destruction and the traffic,” said Del Prete. “The destruction was from clear cutting for roads, well pads, compressor stations, metering stations, pipelines, and rights-of-way.”

She admitted she was nervous about talking to Kernan on camera, but said, “I did it so people would know what’s going on.” She continued, “I want people to know how destructive it is to the environment, to the community it’s in, and to the people. The cumulative effect impacts everyone in this county.” While some are encouraged by a slowdown in the industry because of a drop in oil prices, Del Prete, offered, “I don’t think it’s over by a long shot.”

Help tell the story
After listening to Tina tell her story, if you want to help spread her story so that the fossil-fuel mono-economy will not take precedence over the lives of West Virginians and all of those impacted by fracking, please visit the website below to contribute to the Kickstarter campaign. By giving, you will help ensure that the Tina’s story and the accounts of so many others are heard – and heeded.

To learn more about the Kickstarter campaign please visit:
hillshollowsdoc.com

Press Release For West Virginia Based Feature Film

 
To Contribute visit –       hillshollowsdoc.com

News Release
Questions? KeelyKernan@gmail.com
Kickstarter Campaign Launched for West Virginia Based Feature Film
‘In the Hills and Hollows’ follows the lives of those impacted by the fossil fuel industries.​
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. – F​ilmmaker Keely Kernan has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help finance a feature film, based in West Virginia, that documents the impact of the fossil fuel industries. W​est Virginia has fueled America since the early 19th century when the coal industry began dominating the state. In the southern part of the state, the counties that produce the most coal are some of the poorest counties in the United States. Now there i​s another fossil fuel industry operating on some of the oldest mountains on earth – fracking for natural gas.

The natural gas industry is now starting to get a foothold in several counties in North Central West Virginia; other areas –​s​uch as Doddridge, Wetzel and Tyler counties –​h​ave had this industry operating within their borders for years. Due to a shift in market demand, and the development of technology to access the Marcellus Shale formation, a massive natural gas boom has swept through these rural communities. Much like the immense infrastructure built to support the coal industry, large new infrastructure systems are being built to produce and transport natural gas acquired through fracking. There are currently four pipelines proposed, each measuring over three feet in diameter, to transport natural gas from northern West Virginia to other states and ports for export

“In the Hills and Hollows” investigates the boom and bust impact that mono­-economies based on fossil fuel extraction have on adjacent neighboring people and communities. “​It takes the viewer on a visual journey through the coal fields of southern West Virginia and into the gas fields in the north to juxtapose the impact that the fossil fuel industry has had on residents and the landscape of Appalachia. T​he film provides an intimate look into the lives of several West Virginia residents living in the middle of the fracking boom and explores how their quality of life has changed by this industry.  The objective of the film is to inspire an urgent conversation about what is at risk and to expose the situation we are facing. “The issues happening here are not just found in West Virginia but throughout the country” says Kernan.

The project is sponsored in part by the Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition and the Civil Society Institute. A Kickstarter campaign was launched to raise additional funds needed in order to continue producing the film.​For a list of Kickstarter rewards and pledge levels, visit hillshollowsdoc.com ​C​ontributors have the opportunity to receive various rewards that include prints from the film, music from bluegrass musician Ben Townsend, art work from West Virginia artist Mike Costello, special thanks in the end credits of the film, and much more. Those making the most significant contributions will receive credit as an associate producer, producer, or executive producer. Organizations also have the opportunity to receive sponsorship credit with their name and logo in the end credits of the film and on the project’s website.

To learn more about the kickstarter campaign please visit:
hillshollowsdoc.com
About Keely Kernan
Keely Kernan is an award winning filmmaker and photographer. Her work is dedicated to producing media that enlightens people about relevant social and environmental topics. As a storyteller she is driven by a desire to connect the viewer and inspire conversations that will influence and initiate reform.

Extended Trailer Screenings

Filmmaker Keely Kernan is hosting screenings of the extended trailer of a feature film entitled ‘​In the Hills and Hollows.’ The film ​is an intimate exploration of life in the midst of the natural gas boom in West Virginia and explores the often dire consequences of mono-­economies based on fossil fuels.” Kernan will be presenting the trailer at each event to help raise awareness about the film, the topic it explores and to spread awareness about a Kickstarter campaign to help finance the film.

Shepherdstown, West Virginia
Date: M​ay 7th 2015
Screening Start 7​:00 pm
Location: 131 W German St, Shepherdstown, WV 25443 Shepherdstown Opera House, West Virginia.

La Paix Herb Farm
Alum Bridge, West Virginia
Date: M​ay 9th, 2015
Location: 3052 Crooked Run Rd Alum Bridge, West Virginia

Charleston West Virginia
Date: M​ay 16th 2015
Screening Start 7​:00 pm
Location: 600 Virginia Street West Charleston, West Virginia.

Lewisburg, West Virginia
Date: M​ay 30th 2015
Screening Start 7​:00 pm
Location: Casasanta 122 North Court Street Lewisburg, WV 24901

Film Screenings and Kickstarter Launch Party -Shepherdstown WV

HillsAndHollowsLogoclearblack

For Immediate Release

Contact:  Keely Kernan (717) 552-3072 / KeelyKernan@gmail.com

Film Screenings and Kickstarter Launch Party

‘In the Hills and Hollows’ follows the lives of those impacted by the fossil fuel industries

SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. — Filmmaker Keely Kernan is launching a Kickstarter campaign to help finance a feature film, based in West Virginia, that documents the impact of the fossil fuel industries upon people and communities throughout the Mountain State. A launch party for the Kickstarter campaign will be held at the Opera House in Shepherdstown on May 7th. Opening reception will start at 7 p.m. There will be live music, food and drinks.

Starting at 7:30 p.m. the event will feature a screening of a series of short films about environmental topics, including the water crisis in West Virginia and the effects that coal and natural gas extraction has had on residents and the landscape of Appalachia. The extended trailer for the feature film, “In the Hills and Hollows,” will also be screened. Speakers include filmmaker Keely Kernan, Elise Keaton from the Greenbrier River Watershed Association, and Autumn Long, a landowner in Harrison County.

“‘In the Hills and Hollows’ is an intimate exploration of life in the midst of the natural gas boom in West Virginia and explores the often dire consequences of mono-economies based on fossil fuels.” For example in the southern part of the state, the counties that produce the most coal are some of the poorest counties in the United States. Much like the infrastructure built to support the coal industry, large new infrastructure systems are being built to produce and transport natural gas acquired through fracking. There are currently four pipelines proposed, up to 42 inches in diameter, to transport natural gas from northern West Virginia to other states and ports for export.

Speaker Elise Keaton and Autumn Long are both featured in the film.  If approved, the Mountain Valley Pipeline would be built right next to Autumn Long’s property in Harrison County. Autumn will be traveling from Harrison County to share her story and experiences.  Elise Keaton, from the Greenbrier River Watershed Association, has tirelessly driven thousands of miles across West Virginia to educate Mountain State residents about the pipelines, their rights and how they can make their voices heard on this vital topic.

Kernan says, “The goal is to provide a space through which the public can learn about the issues in a way that connects them to the stories being shared in the film. And raise awareness about the kickstarter campaign to help raise funds for the feature film.”

The event is being organized in conjunction with Sustainable Shepherdstown and the Shepherdstown Opera House. To date the short films have been sponsored in part by the Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition. A Kickstarter campaign will be launched on May 7th to raise additional funds needed in order to produce the feature film “In the Hills and Hollow.” Contributors have the opportunity to receive various rewards such as a special thank you in the end credits of the film and much more. Those making the most significant contributions will receive credit as an associate producer, producer, or executive producer. Organizations also have the opportunity to receive official sponsorship credit with their name and logo in the end credits of the film.

Free and Open to the Public

Event: Film Screenings and Kickstarter Launch Party

Date: May 7th 2015

Opening Reception 7:00 pm (Live music, food, and drinks)

Screening Start 7:30 pm

Location: Shepherdstown Opera House 131 W German Street Shepherdstown, WV

Learn More

www.inthehillsandhollows.com

Find us on social media

www.facebook.com/Inthehillsandhollows

www.twitter.com/HillsHollowsDoc